White Wine . NET

By Giuliano Bortolleto

Asti wine, White Wines

The Asti is a well-known sparkling wine from the Piemonte’s region, in the north of Italy, where there is a city named Asti, which explains the name of the wine. The Asti, as well as the Moscato sparkling wine, is made from the traditional white grape of that area, the muscat. This is one of the most popular wines from that region and in all Italy.

This grape is also responsable for another famous sparkling wine of that region: the Moscato D’Asti, which is a different wine, although is elaborated with the same grape. But that is a matter for our next post. Asti is a litte different from the other general sparkling wines. That’s because there is no second fermentation. There is only one fermentation which is made in a closed tub (autoclave). But before the fermentation is concluded, the producer interrupts it, what creates a high level sugar wine.

That’s why Asti is wordly known as a sweet and fresh wine, particulary perfec to pair with some deserts. Asti is also very easy drinkable, due to the low level of alcohol in the wine, which is a consequence of the interrupted fermentation too. In the end, the drink is sweet and not much alcoholic, however it conserves a very cool acidity that is soon noted as you feel the first citrus aromas.

Asti also has some sweet lime, lemon and apple flavours, and, if you choose a good producer, a very nice perlage too. Although Asti is known as a very sweet wine, which is not a quite lie, it is absolutelly perfect to goes with some apple deserts, lemon sweets and vanilla deserts.

It should be served at 6 to 8 Celsius

 By Giuliano Bortolleto

On my last post I talked about the great quality of the south-american white wines. More specifically about the chilean Sauvignon Blanc and the argentinean Chardonnay. Now, I will talk about the taste of the three wines I have detached on that post one by one.

Domaines Barons Rothschild - Los Vascos Sauvignon Blanc 2007: This winery was created in 1988 by the Domaines Barons Rothschild, producer of the Chatêau Lafite. That’s why they always aim to put their french philosophy in their wines, which usually are more delicated and sophisticated then the other chilean wines, and with less alcohol too. This Sauvignon Blanc is very citrus, with some lemon and passion fruit notes on the aroma and also on the flavour. Very bright and clear colour. Excelent to pair with light meals and appetizer for the hot summer.

Viña Errazuriz - Reserva Sauvignon Blanc 2007: The winery Erazuriz really knows how to produce great Sauvignon Blancs. This one is very very fresh and has a fantastic passion fruit aroma. Very nice to enjoy a hot day with some salad.

Casa Lapostolle - Sauvignon Blanc 2007: Casa Lapostolle is certainly one of the best wineries of Chile. They really knows how to take care of a winery in order to extract the most that the grape can give to the wine. The Clos Apalta 2005 wine is a real proof of that. About the Sauvignon Blanc, i must say that is very surprising. A very special special mineral aroma. Very refined. It really express the local terroir. It is also citrus, with some pine apple notes. Perfect to be drunk young.

By Giuliano Bortolleto, january 26th

It is unquestionable the great potencial of both Argentina and Chile to produce, besides the known and recognized red wines (Cabernet Sauvignon in Chile’s case and Malbec in Argentina’s one), good white wines, mostly with the french world famous Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay. These two white grapes are being produced in almost every wine producers countries, and they are always capable of producing great fruity wines. And so it is in the South American countries.

Casa Lapostolle Sauvignon Blanc 2004 | White Wines

Argentina and Chile have been producing very nice white wines with Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. However, I really preffer the Sauvignons from Chile and the Chardonays from Argentina. To be more specific, the Sauvignon Blanc from the Casablanca Valley, in Chile, and the Chardonnay from Mendoza, in Argentina.

The Sauvignon Blanc from Casablanca Valley absolutelly assimilates the mineral charateristic, at the same time that it conserves a good acidity, which transforms the drink into a very very fresh drink, perfect to pair it with some salads or white fishes with lemon spice. In its youthness, the Sauvignon Blanc from Casablanca express a yelow to green color, that comproves the nice acidity that is conserved in the wine.

About the Chardonnays from Mendoza, we could say that unctuousness is a good word to describe them. The majority of the Chardonays from this region are very concentrated, has a very special of tropical fruits aroma (pine apples, peaches, star-fruits), and tend to be very creamy and silken, due to the contact with the oak. Yes, it never is very good to pair a long-time-oak-stay with the Chardonnay, because, usually, the result is a poor fruity wine, with too much oak characteristics, like dry fruits and butter. Nevertheless there are some very goog examples of Chardonnays wines in Mendoza, with some great acidity and very bright color.

Here I will tell some very nice examples of the best os the chilean Sauvignon Blancs and the argentinean Chardonnays.

Chile: Errazuriz - Reserva Sauvignon Blanc 2007; Domaines Barons Rothschild - Los Vascos Sauvignon Blanc 2007; Casa Lapostolle - Sauvignon Blanc 2007.

Argentina: Rutini - Rutini Chardonnay 2006; Catena Zapata – Catena Alta Chardonnay 2005; Terrazas de los Andes Chardonnay Reserva 2008

Terrazas de los Andes Reserva Chardonnay | White Wines

The Real Riesling | White Wines

January 22nd, 2009

That’s a very good tutorial video to those who still think that the Riesling wines are just some sweet wines, with poor quality. Actually, Riesling is one of the most important white grapes in the world. And in the regions of Alsace (France), Pfalz, Baden and other german areas, Austria, Switzerland, and now even from the Washington and Oregon states in USA, you will be able to find a very fresh, with a very nice acidity. That’s what makes the Riesling wines one of the best in the world in terms of pairing with food. Listen to what she says in the video and have a nice Riesling wine by yourself.

This a very short video. However, it is a very good tutorial to those who want to know what the Chardonay grape does represent in the wine world. It is the most planted white grape, and centainly is the most versatile white grape. It is very adaptive an is able to produce very good wines in any wine producer region. The video is nice because it says somethigs about the different types of Chardonays that are produced in the world, and also the correct food to pair with it. Watch it.

Giuliano Bortolleto, 21th january of 2009

This is a great example of a very good Chardonay from the sub-region of Côte Chalonnaise, in Burgundy, France. The Chardonays of this region tend to be very different from the well known region of Chablis, in the north of Burgundy. In Chablis the grapes are cultivated in a more cold climate, and it is very high region, which provide a great acidity and freshness to the wine. In Côte Chalonnaise, the climate is a litte more hot. So the wines produced in this region use to be more thick and dense, when compared to the Chablis ones. The flavours of Côte Chalonnaise are also different. They are not so fruity and fresh, but they have a very good taste of dry fruits, such as nuits and hazelnuts. The aroma also bring some smell of white flowers.

La Buxynoise Montagny 1er Cru Cuvée Spéciale blanc 2005

This Chardonay from Côte Chalonnaise, produced by Cave des Vignerons de Buxy, from the city of Montagny, is a very special one. Very nice to pair with robust fishes, and, specially with pork loin. It has aromas fo white flowers and also mint. In the mouth it is very persistent. The final brings a remembrance of the nuits.

By Giuliano Bortolleto, january 20th, 2009

The Argentina is well-known into the wine world by its great Malbec wines. The Malbec is the national grape of the country and wherever you find a Malbec wine you remember the examples of Argentina. This grape has taken Argentinean wines to all over the globe, an its fame has transformed the country in one of the most important wine producers of the world, competing with France, Italy and other famous wine producers countries. However, another grape in Argentina has called the atention of the wine consumers. It is the Torrontés.

Torrontés grape

This autochthon grape have been producing some very special wines with a very characteristical flavor and aroma that reminds the french Viognier, from Condrieu. The Torrontés wines are so much complex and rich. They are a very nice alternative to the Oak Chardonays. They can express some aromas which remind something mineral and white roses, but also some fuity smell, like pears, green apple, melon, and also a very elegant peach aroma. The Torrontés is a wine with a mid-level body, and can pair with salads, sea food, and I, particulary, like it with japanese food.

Almost all the argentinean regions that produce wines make some examples of Torrontés. Nevertheless, there is nothing superior than the Torrontés from the region of Salta, in the north of the country, in which the grape can be cultivated on 1700 to 2400 meters above the sea level.

Terrazas Torrontés

I would like to put in relief two examples. The first one is the Terrazas de los Andes Torrontés 2008. That’s a wine to be drinked as soon as possible in order to make good use of its youth, and exploit the mineral aroma and its freshness in the mouth. It also brings some very special aroma of peaches.

Alta Vista Premium Torrontés

The second one is the Alta Vista Premium 2006. It is different from the Terrazas because it has a most robust body, it has more personality and a very persistent aroma. The smell of white roses is very intense and it can be well paired with some sea food or roast fishes.

by Wink Lorch

Sometimes my self-imposed brief seems to be to collect obscure wine regions, preferably in or close to mountainous areas. Hence, my acceptance of an invitation to a Clairette de Die (pronounced ‘Dee’) harvest festival.

This was the ideal focus for an exploration of the Diois (pronounced ‘Deewah’) area of the Drôme department, which lies just south of the stunning Col de Rousset pass, generally considered to be the north-south dividing point of the French Alps. To the north, the vegetation is typically continental with mountain spruce, larches and alpine cows; to the south it changes towards Mediterranean, with umbrella pines, ‘garrigue’ scrubland and hundreds of sheep.

In wine terms, the Die area is included in the Rhône Valley region (though it doesn’t fit into either north or south categories); the town of Die is 50km (30 miles) southeast of Valence and the vineyards follow the Drôme River, a tributary of the Rhône. The vineyards are some of the highest in France (higher than most in Savoie for example), lying between 400 and 700 metres with a climate that is a cross between semi-continental and semi-Mediterranean.
Clairette de Die
There are different versions of how the semi-sweet, delicate sparkling Clairette de Die got its name. Strangely it is not named after the Clairette grape even though it’s grown there. Sparkling wine had been made in this area for centuries, even in the days of Pliny, when Muscat was mentioned as grown here; however, it was most widely enjoyed in the late 19th century. At the turn of the 20th century, in the closest large towns of Lyon and Grenoble, the fizzy wine from Die was still sold in bars directly from a barrel - a little like Vin Bourru, the part fermented wine which is sold just after harvest all over France. Needless to say, it was cloudy with the yeast in suspension, but gradually it would clear leaving the deposit behind - so the name derived from this phenomenon of ‘clearing’ or ‘clairette’.

The main grape grown is Muscat à Petit Grains (shown left) which for AOC Clairette de Die must be at least 75% of the blend, with the balance being Clairette, better known further south in the Rhône. Some of the best Clairette de Die is made with 100% Muscat. Clairette is an acidic grape used in particular here for the dry sparkling wines, previously Clairette de Die Brut but now, with stricter production controls, Crémant de Die, in which recent changes to the law state that small quantities of both Muscat and Aligoté must also be included.The area also makes a little still wine, the best from the appellation Châtillon-en-Diois, named after a village at higher altitude than Die - these are dry, fresh whites from Chardonnay and Aligoté, and light reds/rosés from Gamay and Pinot Noir grapes.

Search: http://www.wine-pages.com/guests/wink/die.htm

It seems that the years running up to the Exposition Universelle de Paris in 1855 were indeed busy for the merchants of Bordeaux. That they were charged with drawing up a new classification of the red wines of the Médoc, in order to facilitate showing the wines at the exhibition, is well known. It is easy to forget, however, that the sweet wines of Sauternes and Barsac were classified along with their red counterparts.

As with the wines of the Médoc, the sweet wines were classified according to market value. It is not surprising that the Bordeaux négociants already had firmly established league tables, based largely on price (and therefore quality), and this knowledge formed the basis for this particular Bordeaux classification.

The system is less complicated than the Médoc classification, with essentially just two tiers, although within the higher ranking Yquem is accorded special recognition with its rating as Premier Cru Supérieur, an accolade unmatched by any wine from the Médoc. Below this level come the remaining 25 properties, and they range right across the quality spectrum, from the frequently delicious - such as Rieussec, Coutet and Climens - to the rarely seen, which obviously produce wines on which I am unable to comment. Here I am thinking of estates such as Caillou, Myrat and Suau, to name three examples, all second growth properties that should perhaps have a somewhat higher profile.

Chateau d’Yquem

With all such classifications the first question usually trotted out is relevance. What does this classification mean to us today? In quite straightforward terms I would argue none at all, and I would suggest that those who proffer a newly revised classification simply suffer from a lack of imagination. This is an item of historical interest, nothing more. The wines were classified to inform visitors to an exhibition, more than 150 years ago, as to which wines should impress them most, assuming those that cost the most also tasted the best. Today, the world is populated by a very different body of consumers, and to be frank very few of these consumers have any interest in Bordeaux, never mind the communes of Sauternes of Barsac, at all. Those that do, however, buy on tasting experience, track record and critical review, and for the latter they usually pay a handsome subscription fee. It may be that many of the high ranking properties continue to dominate the trade, that the premier cru estates on the whole tend to be better known, and tend to make better wines, than those ranked as deuxième cru. But this is not an unchallengeable assertion; there are a number of wines that frequently disappoint, as well as some that punch well above their weight - their weight in 1855, that is. It is these properties that show classifications such as this to be nothing more than an historical curiosity that we should all summarily acknowledge, and then summarily ignore, before moving on to taste and explore the wines of the region for ourselves. (30/11/07)

Source: http://www.thewinedoctor.com/regionalguides/bordeauxclassificationssauternes.shtml

By Giuliano Bortolleto

As the summer has came, the hot climate come to inspire us to drink fresh dinks. And if you are a wine fanatic appreciator as me, you cannot pass through this without drinking good wines. Of course you will not be able to taste and degust full-bodied and
complex red wines due to the high temperature. So it`s time to try some fresh and pleasant white wines, which are very easy to drink in low temperatures and refresh your summer with charm and elegancy.

Here I am going to present you four Sauvignon Blanc wines. This grape is very special to the summer. Sauvignon Blanc is one of the most fresh and refreshing grapes to taste, and its subtleness and simplicity makes it the perfect choise for a hot day. The grape is also good when harmonized with light fishes, salads and sea food. Check out the options.

Casa Lapostolle Sauvignon Blanc 2007
The first one is the Casa Lapostolle Sauvignon Blanc 2007. This is my favorite. Its flavours of green apple and pear make a fruity taste. But the difference of this wine is its mineral flavours. This is a characteristic of the wines of the Colchagua Valley in Chile. The rocky soil of the region adds to the wine this mineral flavour, which gives a freshy taste and a special smell to the Sauvignon Blanc of the Valley.

Another very good option to the summer is the Equus Sauvignon-Blanc 2007 of the Winery Viña Haras de Pirque, Maipo Valley in Chile. This one has some little differences. One of them is the body of the wine. It has a greater density then the Casa Lapostolle one. Still, it is a very fresh and fruity wine. With aromas of pine apple and green apple, and also with some spice perfumes. The taste is very persistet. Pairs with soles and light risotos.

The third Sauvignon Blanc wine is the argentinian El Portillo 2007. Thiis is the most fruity one. Pine apple, pear, green apple and melons too can be easly smelled. The wine is very perfumed and has a simple but refreshing taste. It is also vey cheap.

Alamos Sauvigon Blanc 2007
The last one belongs to a Catena Zapata winery. It is the Alamos Sauvignon Blanc 2007. This is also a special aone. Fruity and mineral, is one of the most fresh ones and pairs very well with sea food. A nice choice to drink in a sunny day.

All of thiese wines, as you can see, are from 2007. It always a good idea to drink a Sauvignon Blanc wine as soon as it come in the store.This is a grape that does not develop its tastes and flavours. On the contrary, it can rapidly loose some characteristics of fruits. The ideal temperature to drink this kind of wine is 11 or 12 Celsius. Drink a refreshing sauvigon blanc and enjoy your summer with pleasant wines.

Cheers!

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