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 By Giuliano Bortolleto

On my last post I talked about the great quality of the south-american white wines. More specifically about the chilean Sauvignon Blanc and the argentinean Chardonnay. Now, I will talk about the taste of the three wines I have detached on that post one by one.

Domaines Barons Rothschild - Los Vascos Sauvignon Blanc 2007: This winery was created in 1988 by the Domaines Barons Rothschild, producer of the Chatêau Lafite. That’s why they always aim to put their french philosophy in their wines, which usually are more delicated and sophisticated then the other chilean wines, and with less alcohol too. This Sauvignon Blanc is very citrus, with some lemon and passion fruit notes on the aroma and also on the flavour. Very bright and clear colour. Excelent to pair with light meals and appetizer for the hot summer.

Viña Errazuriz - Reserva Sauvignon Blanc 2007: The winery Erazuriz really knows how to produce great Sauvignon Blancs. This one is very very fresh and has a fantastic passion fruit aroma. Very nice to enjoy a hot day with some salad.

Casa Lapostolle - Sauvignon Blanc 2007: Casa Lapostolle is certainly one of the best wineries of Chile. They really knows how to take care of a winery in order to extract the most that the grape can give to the wine. The Clos Apalta 2005 wine is a real proof of that. About the Sauvignon Blanc, i must say that is very surprising. A very special special mineral aroma. Very refined. It really express the local terroir. It is also citrus, with some pine apple notes. Perfect to be drunk young.

Giuliano Bortolleto, 21th january of 2009

This is a great example of a very good Chardonay from the sub-region of Côte Chalonnaise, in Burgundy, France. The Chardonays of this region tend to be very different from the well known region of Chablis, in the north of Burgundy. In Chablis the grapes are cultivated in a more cold climate, and it is very high region, which provide a great acidity and freshness to the wine. In Côte Chalonnaise, the climate is a litte more hot. So the wines produced in this region use to be more thick and dense, when compared to the Chablis ones. The flavours of Côte Chalonnaise are also different. They are not so fruity and fresh, but they have a very good taste of dry fruits, such as nuits and hazelnuts. The aroma also bring some smell of white flowers.

La Buxynoise Montagny 1er Cru Cuvée Spéciale blanc 2005

This Chardonay from Côte Chalonnaise, produced by Cave des Vignerons de Buxy, from the city of Montagny, is a very special one. Very nice to pair with robust fishes, and, specially with pork loin. It has aromas fo white flowers and also mint. In the mouth it is very persistent. The final brings a remembrance of the nuits.

Heather Johnston, demonstrates how easy and delicious grilled clams can be, and pairs them with three satisfying Chardonnays.

White Wine Glass

February 18th, 2008


White Wine GlassA wine glass is a type of glass stemware which is used to drink and taste wine. It is generally composed of three parts: the bowl, stem, and foot. Selection of a particular wine glass for a wine style is important, as the glass shape can influence its perception.

Proper Use

It is important to note the most obvious, but often most neglected, part of the wine glass—the stem. The proper way to drink from the wine glass is to grasp it by the stem and drink. The purpose of this is so the temperature of the wine is not affected when holding the glass. This is achieved because the stem is not in direct contact with the wine. It would be more difficult to control the temperature of the wine if one held the glass by the bowl because it is in direct contact with the wine.

Materials

Wine glasses made of fused or cut glass will often interfere with the flavor of the wine, as well as creating a rough, thick lip, from which it is not as pleasurable to drink. Blown glass results in a better vessel, with a thinner lip, and is usually acceptable for casual wine drinkers. High quality wine glasses are often made of lead crystal, which is not technically crystal, but is merely called it through convention.[citation needed] Lead crystal glasses’ advantages are primarily aesthetic, having a higher index of refraction, thus changing the effect of light passing through them, but lead poisoning becomes a danger. Using lead in the crystal matrix also offers several advantages in the material’s workability during production. Wine glasses are generally not coloured or frosted as this would impede the appreciation of its colour.

Shapes

The shape of the glass is also very important, as it concentrates the flavor and aroma (or bouquet) to emphasize the varietal’s characteristic. The shape of the glass also directs the wine itself into the best area of the mouth from the varietal. Though to say that a given varietal has a specific target area of delivery in the mouth is wildly speculative, despite the marketing attempts of prominent stemware manufacturers, such as Riedel and Spiegelau, to make consumers believe this. Some small benefit may be derived from drinking a given varietal from its specially designed glass, but to go so far as to say it improves the taste of the wine would be to go too far. In general the opening of the glass is not wider than the widest part of the bowl.

The stem of a glass is an important feature as it provides a way to hold the glass without warming the wine from body heat. It also prevents fingerprints from smearing the glass, and makes the glass easier to swirl. Except for the wine connoisseur, wine glasses can be divided into three types: red wine glasses, white wine glasses and champagne flutes.

White wine glasses

White wine glasses are generally narrower, although not as narrow as champagne flutes, with somewhat straight or tulip-shaped sides. The narrowness of the white wine glass allows the chilled wine to retain its temperature for two reasons;

The reduced surface area of the glass (in comparison to red wine glasses) means less air circulating around the glass and warming the wine.
The smaller bowl of the glass means less contact between the hand and the glass, and so body heat does not transfer as easily to the wine.

Decoration

In the 18th Century, glassmakers would draw spiral patterns in the stem as they made the glass. If they used air bubbles it was called an airtwist if they used threads, either white or colored, it would be called opaque twist. [1]

ISO Wine tasting glass

The ISO has standardized a series of glasses for wine tasting. They are stemmed with elongated, tapered bowls, with capacities of 120 (for sherry), 210, 300 or 410: milliliters.ISO 3591:1977

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_glass

White Wine serving temperature

February 18th, 2008

The wine serving temperature at can greatly influence the taste of a wine. Serving of a wine cool can help to mask the flaws seen in young or cheap wines, whereas serving wine warmer can allow the bouquet and complexity to be expressed, which is ideal for aged and expensive wines. Lower temperatures also repress the ‘bite’ that alcohol can give in lighter bodied wines. Below is a table showing ideal wine serving temperatures.

°C °F Wine style
12 53.5 Full bodied white wines
11 52 Medium bodied white wines
5 45 Goon
10 50 Light bodied white wines, Dessert wines
9 48 Vintage sparkling
7 44.5 Non vintage sparkling












Ideal serving temperature and ideal storage temperature can differ.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_serving_temperature

Wine grape varieties are variously evaluated according to a wide range of descriptors which draw comparisons with other, non-grape flavors and aromas. The following table provides a brief and by no means exhaustive summary of typical descriptors for the better-known varietals.

White grape variety Common sensory descriptors
Albariño lemon, minerals
Breidecker apple, pear
Chardonnay butter, melon, apple, pineapple, vanilla (if oaked, eg vinified or aged in new oak aging barrels)
Chenin Blanc wet wool, beeswax, honey, apple, almond
Gewürztraminer rose petals, lychee, spice
Grüner Veltliner green apple, citrus
Marsanne almond, honeysuckle, marzipan
Melon de Bourgogne lime, salt, green apple
Muscat honey, grapes, lime
Palomino honeydew, citrus, raw nuts
Pinot Gris (Pinot Grigio) white peach, pear, apricot
Prosecco apple, honey, musk, citrus
Riesling citrus fruits, peach, honey, petrol
Sauvignon Blanc gooseberry, lime, asparagus, cut grass, bell pepper (capsicum), grapefruit, passionfruit, cat pee (guava)
Sémillon honey, orange, lime
Trebbiano (Ugni Blanc) lime, herbs
Verdicchio apple, minerals, citrus
Vermentino pear, cream, green fruits
Viognier peach, pear, nutmeg, apricot

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_tasting

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