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Posts tagged ‘White grapes’

 By Giuliano Bortolleto

On my last post I talked about the great quality of the south-american white wines. More specifically about the chilean Sauvignon Blanc and the argentinean Chardonnay. Now, I will talk about the taste of the three wines I have detached on that post one by one.

Domaines Barons Rothschild - Los Vascos Sauvignon Blanc 2007: This winery was created in 1988 by the Domaines Barons Rothschild, producer of the Chatêau Lafite. That’s why they always aim to put their french philosophy in their wines, which usually are more delicated and sophisticated then the other chilean wines, and with less alcohol too. This Sauvignon Blanc is very citrus, with some lemon and passion fruit notes on the aroma and also on the flavour. Very bright and clear colour. Excelent to pair with light meals and appetizer for the hot summer.

Viña Errazuriz - Reserva Sauvignon Blanc 2007: The winery Erazuriz really knows how to produce great Sauvignon Blancs. This one is very very fresh and has a fantastic passion fruit aroma. Very nice to enjoy a hot day with some salad.

Casa Lapostolle - Sauvignon Blanc 2007: Casa Lapostolle is certainly one of the best wineries of Chile. They really knows how to take care of a winery in order to extract the most that the grape can give to the wine. The Clos Apalta 2005 wine is a real proof of that. About the Sauvignon Blanc, i must say that is very surprising. A very special special mineral aroma. Very refined. It really express the local terroir. It is also citrus, with some pine apple notes. Perfect to be drunk young.

By Giuliano Bortolleto, january 26th

It is unquestionable the great potencial of both Argentina and Chile to produce, besides the known and recognized red wines (Cabernet Sauvignon in Chile’s case and Malbec in Argentina’s one), good white wines, mostly with the french world famous Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay. These two white grapes are being produced in almost every wine producers countries, and they are always capable of producing great fruity wines. And so it is in the South American countries.

Casa Lapostolle Sauvignon Blanc 2004 | White Wines

Argentina and Chile have been producing very nice white wines with Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. However, I really preffer the Sauvignons from Chile and the Chardonays from Argentina. To be more specific, the Sauvignon Blanc from the Casablanca Valley, in Chile, and the Chardonnay from Mendoza, in Argentina.

The Sauvignon Blanc from Casablanca Valley absolutelly assimilates the mineral charateristic, at the same time that it conserves a good acidity, which transforms the drink into a very very fresh drink, perfect to pair it with some salads or white fishes with lemon spice. In its youthness, the Sauvignon Blanc from Casablanca express a yelow to green color, that comproves the nice acidity that is conserved in the wine.

About the Chardonnays from Mendoza, we could say that unctuousness is a good word to describe them. The majority of the Chardonays from this region are very concentrated, has a very special of tropical fruits aroma (pine apples, peaches, star-fruits), and tend to be very creamy and silken, due to the contact with the oak. Yes, it never is very good to pair a long-time-oak-stay with the Chardonnay, because, usually, the result is a poor fruity wine, with too much oak characteristics, like dry fruits and butter. Nevertheless there are some very goog examples of Chardonnays wines in Mendoza, with some great acidity and very bright color.

Here I will tell some very nice examples of the best os the chilean Sauvignon Blancs and the argentinean Chardonnays.

Chile: Errazuriz - Reserva Sauvignon Blanc 2007; Domaines Barons Rothschild - Los Vascos Sauvignon Blanc 2007; Casa Lapostolle - Sauvignon Blanc 2007.

Argentina: Rutini - Rutini Chardonnay 2006; Catena Zapata – Catena Alta Chardonnay 2005; Terrazas de los Andes Chardonnay Reserva 2008

Terrazas de los Andes Reserva Chardonnay | White Wines

The Real Riesling | White Wines

January 22nd, 2009

That’s a very good tutorial video to those who still think that the Riesling wines are just some sweet wines, with poor quality. Actually, Riesling is one of the most important white grapes in the world. And in the regions of Alsace (France), Pfalz, Baden and other german areas, Austria, Switzerland, and now even from the Washington and Oregon states in USA, you will be able to find a very fresh, with a very nice acidity. That’s what makes the Riesling wines one of the best in the world in terms of pairing with food. Listen to what she says in the video and have a nice Riesling wine by yourself.

This a very short video. However, it is a very good tutorial to those who want to know what the Chardonay grape does represent in the wine world. It is the most planted white grape, and centainly is the most versatile white grape. It is very adaptive an is able to produce very good wines in any wine producer region. The video is nice because it says somethigs about the different types of Chardonays that are produced in the world, and also the correct food to pair with it. Watch it.

Trebbiano | White Wines

February 26th, 2008


Trebbiano Grape | White WinesTrebbiano is a grape variety that probably makes more white wine in the world than any other. It gives good yields, but makes undistinguished wine at best. It can be fresh and fruity, but doesn’t keep long. Its high acidity makes it important in cognac production. Also known as Ugni Blanc, it has many other names reflecting a family of local subtypes, particularly in Italy and France.

History

Trebbiano may have originated in the Eastern Mediterranean, and was known in Italy in Roman times. A subtype was recognised in Bologna in the thirteenth century, and as Ugni Blanc it made its way to France, possibly during the Papal retreat to Avignon in the fourteenth century.

Distribution and Wines

Argentina

Like many Italian grapes, Trebbiano came to Argentina with Italian immigrants.

Australia

“White Hermitage” came to Australia with James Busby in 1832. The major plantings are in New South Wales and South Australia, where it is mostly used for brandy and for blending with other grapes in table wine.

Bulgaria

In Bulgaria as in Portugal it is known as ‘Thalia’

France

‘Ugni Blanc’ is the most widely planted white grape of France, being found particularly along the Provençal coast, in the Gironde and Charente. It is also known as ‘Clairette Ronde’, ‘Clairette de Vence’, ‘Queue de Renard’, and in Corsica as ‘Rossola’. Most of the table wine is unremarkable and often blended or turned into industrial alcohol.

Under the name ‘St. Émilion’, Trebbiano is important in brandy production, being the most common grape variety of the Cognac and Armagnac regions.

Italy
Trebbiano | White Wines
The Trebbiano family account for around a third of all white wine in Italy. It is mentioned in over 80 of Italy’s DOCs, although it has just six of its own : Trebbiano d’Abruzzo, Trebbiano di Aprilia, Trebbiano di Arborea, Trebbiano di Capriano del Colle, Trebbiano di Romagna and Trebbiano Val Trebbia dei Colli Piacentini.

Perhaps the most successful Trebbiano-based blend are the Orvieto whites of Umbria, which use a local clone called Procanico.

Trebbiano is also used to produce balsamic vinegar.

Portugal

As in Bulgaria, the variety is known as ‘Thalia’ in Portugal.

USA

Italian immigrants brought Trebbiano to California, but it’s seldom seen as a single variety table wine.

Vine and Viticulture

The vine is vigorous and high-yielding, with long cylindrical bunches of tough-skinned berries that yield acidic yellow juice.

Synonyms

Albano, Biancone, Blanc Auba, Blanc De Cadillac, Blancoun, Bobiano, Bonebeou, Branquinha, Brocanico, Bubbiano, Buriano, Buzzetto, Cadillac, Cadillate, Castelli, Castelli Romani, Castillone, Chator, Clairette D’Afrique, Clairette De Vence, Clairette Ronde, Engana Rapazes, Espadeiro Branco, Falanchina, Greco, Gredelin, Hermitage White, Juni Blan, Lugana, Malvasia Fina, Muscadet Aigre, Padeiro Branco, Perugino, Procanico, Procanico Dell Isola D Elba, Procanico Portoferraio, Queue De Renard, Romani, Rossan De Nice, Rossetto, Rossola, Rossula, Roussan, Roussea, Rusciola, Saint Emilion, Saint Emilion Des Charentes, Santoro, Shiraz White, Spoletino, Talia, Trebbianello, Trebbiano, Trebbiano Della Fiamma, Trebbiano Di Cesene, Trebbiano Di Empoli, Trebbiano Di Lucca, Trebbiano Di Tortona, Trebbiano Fiorentino, Trebbiano Toscano, Trebbianone, Tribbiano, Tribbiano Forte, Turbiano, Ugni Blanc, Bouan, Beau, Thalia, Trebbiano di Soave, Trebbiano Romagnolo, Trebbiano Gallo and Trebbiano d’Abruzzo.

Fonte: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trebbiano


Chardonnay | White WinesWhen a recipe calls for white wine, what kind of wine should I look for?

A good one. The general rule of thumb is to cook with a wine you would be happy drinking, because your finished dish is only going to be as good as the ingredients that go into it.

Madeleine Kamman, author of the exceptional but daunting The New Making of a Cook (Canada, UK) offers the following advice:

“If a recipe calls for dry white wine without mentioning the type of wine, use any good dry white wine such as Sauvignon Blanc, if you are a complete beginner, or a Chardonnay if you are a little more experienced and know how to cope with the relatively larger degree of acidity surfacing when Chardonnay wine is reduced. If Sauvignon and Chardonnay are too expensive, use generic wine that tastes round in the mouth just after opening the bottle.”

The use of wine tasting descriptors allow the taster an opportunity to put into words the aromas and flavors that they experience and can be used in assessing the overall quality of wine. Many wine writers, like Karen MacNeil in her book The Wine Bible, note that the difference between casual drinkers and serious wine tasters is the focus and systematic approach to tasting wine with an objective description of what they are sensing. The primary source of a person’s ability to taste wine is derived from their olfactory senses. A taster’s own personal experiences play a significant role in conceptualizing what they are tasting and attaching a description to that perception. The individual nature of tasting means that descriptors may be perceived differently among various tasters.

The following is a list of wine tasting descriptors and a common meaning of the terms.

A-C


  • Astringent An overly tannic white wine.
  • Acidic A wine with a noticeable sense of acidity.
  • Balanced A wine that incorporates all its main components—tannins, acid, sweetness, and alcohol—in a manner where no one single component stands out.
  • Big A wine with intense flavor, or high in alcohol.
  • Body The sense of alcohol in the wine and the sense of feeling in the mouth.
  • Bouquet The layers of smells and aromas perceived in a wine.
  • Chewy The sense of tannins that is not overwhelming.
  • Closed A wine that is not very aromatic.
  • Complex A wine that gives a perception of being multi-layered in terms of flavors and aromas.
  • Concentrated Intense flavors.
  • Connected A sense of the wine’s ability to relay its place of origin or terroir
  • Crisp A pleasing sense of acidity in the wine.


D-H


  • Dry A wine that is lacking the perception of sweetness.
  • Expressive A wine with clearly projected aromas and flavors.
  • Fat A wine that is full in body and has a sense of viscosity.
  • Finish The sense and perception of the wine after swallowing.
  • Firm A stronger sense of tannins.
  • Flabby A lacking sense of acidity.
  • Fresh A positive perception of acidity.
  • Fruit The perception of the grape characteristics and sense of body that is unique to the varietal.
  • Green Overly acidic wine. Typically used to describe a wine made from unripe fruit.
  • Hard Overly tannic wine.
  • Heavy A wine that is very alcoholic with too much sense of body.
  • Hollow A wine lacking the sense of fruit.
  • Hot Overly alcoholic wine.


I-Z


  • Lean The sense of acidity in the wine that lacks a perception of fruit.
  • Mature A wine that has aged to its peak point of quality.
  • Oaky A wine with a noticeable perception of the effects of oak. This can include the sense of vanilla, sweet spices like nutmeg, a creamy body and a smoky or toasted flavor.
  • Powerful A wine with a high level of alcohol that is not excessive alcoholic.
  • Rich A sense of sweetness in the wine that is not excessively sweet.
  • Round A wine that has a good sense of body that is not overly tannic.
  • Smooth A wine with a pleasing texture. Typically refers to a wine with soft tannins.
  • Soft A wine that is not overly tannic.
  • Supple A wine that is not overly tannic.
  • Sweet A wine with a noticeable sense of sugar levels.
  • Tannic A wine with aggressive tannins.
  • Tart A wine with high levels of acidity.
  • Toasty A sense of the charred or smoky taste from an oaked wine.



Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_tasting_descriptors

Wine grape varieties are variously evaluated according to a wide range of descriptors which draw comparisons with other, non-grape flavors and aromas. The following table provides a brief and by no means exhaustive summary of typical descriptors for the better-known varietals.

White grape variety Common sensory descriptors
Albariño lemon, minerals
Breidecker apple, pear
Chardonnay butter, melon, apple, pineapple, vanilla (if oaked, eg vinified or aged in new oak aging barrels)
Chenin Blanc wet wool, beeswax, honey, apple, almond
Gewürztraminer rose petals, lychee, spice
Grüner Veltliner green apple, citrus
Marsanne almond, honeysuckle, marzipan
Melon de Bourgogne lime, salt, green apple
Muscat honey, grapes, lime
Palomino honeydew, citrus, raw nuts
Pinot Gris (Pinot Grigio) white peach, pear, apricot
Prosecco apple, honey, musk, citrus
Riesling citrus fruits, peach, honey, petrol
Sauvignon Blanc gooseberry, lime, asparagus, cut grass, bell pepper (capsicum), grapefruit, passionfruit, cat pee (guava)
Sémillon honey, orange, lime
Trebbiano (Ugni Blanc) lime, herbs
Verdicchio apple, minerals, citrus
Vermentino pear, cream, green fruits
Viognier peach, pear, nutmeg, apricot

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_tasting

This is a list of varieties of cultivated grapes, whether used for wine, or eating as a Table grape, fresh or dried (raisin, currant, sultana).

Single species grapes



While some of the grapes in this section are hybrids, they are hybridized within a single species (for example, Niagara). For those grapes hybridized across species, see below.

Vitis vinifera grapes (wine)


Vitis vinifera (wine and table)


Green table grapes




Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_grape_varieties#White_grapes

White Wines

February 18th, 2008

White wine differs from red wine in, first and most obviously, color. Under that skin, the pulpy part of a white grape is the same color as that of a red grape. The skin dictates the end color for red wine, which differs from the white’s color determinates.

This is mainly due to the pressing of the grapes. When white grapes are picked, they are immediately pressed and the juice is removed from the skins with little contact.

Color in white wine does vary, often from the type of grape, occasionally from the use of wood. Listed below are a few of the most common white varieties in the world wine market and of wine.com. They are listed from lighter bodied, and lighter colored, to fuller bodied with deeper colors. The list is not set in stone – winemaker’s decisions and climate may affect the end result of a white wine’s body and color – we just give you the guidelines.

Grapes/Region Where primarily grown
Champagne Champagne, France
Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris Alsace, France; Italy; Oregon; California
Sauvignon Blanc Loire, France; New Zealand; California; South Africa
Chenin Blanc Loire, France; South Africa
Riesling Germany; Alsace, France; Australia; New Zealand; Washington State; California
Chardonnay Burgundy, France; Australia; California; South America; South Africa; Oregon
Viognier Rhone, France; California



Other white grapes to notice, listed alphabetically:

Grapes Where they grow best
Albariño Spain
Gewurztraminer Alsace, France; Germany
Sémillon Bordeaux, France; Australia



Source: Wine

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